Call 01327 350239
Call 01327 811007
  • Spring Daffodils – Beware of the potential poisons

    Posted on by Kat Mozdzynski

    The spring time is a wonderful time of the year, winter is officially over and gardens, parks and woodlands are bursting with colour as bulbs and blossoms appear.

    The good weather makes us want to spend more time in the great outdoors enjoying what nature brings around every year. Of course, walking the dog is such a much more enjoyable experience too and you can bet your life, our four legged friends love to spend more time in the back garden. But did you know that daffodils and other beautiful flowers and spring plants are actually poisonous to dogs? We have put a list together of the most common plants that can pose a danger to our pets.

    DAFFODILS

    1daf

    These flowers contain lycorine, an alkaloid with strong emetic properties (something that triggers vomiting). Crystals are found in the outer layer of the bulbs, similar to hyacinths, which cause severe tissue irritation and secondary drooling. Ingestion of the bulb, plant or flower can cause severe vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and even possible cardiac arrhythmias or respiratory depression. Daffodil ingestion can result in more severe symptoms so if an exposure is witnessed or symptoms are seen you must contact a vet immediately.

    AZALEA

      azalea

    In the same family as rhododendrons, azaleas can have serious effects on pets. Eating even a few leaves can result in vomiting, diarrhoea and excessive drooling; without immediate veterinary attention, the pet could fall into a coma and possibly die.

    TULIPS

    1tulips

    Tulips contain allergenic lactones. Lactones are derived from chemical compounds and taste a bit like whiskey. Hyacinths contain similar compounds. It’s the bulbs of these two plants, not the leaves or flowers, that are toxic. Symptoms of poisoning by one of these plants can include mouth and oesophageal irritation, drooling, vomiting, diarrhoea, increase in heart rate and changes in breathing.

    LILIES

    1lily

    The variety of lily determines whether it is a relatively harmless or potentially deadly plant. Types of poisonous lilies include the Tiger, Asiatic, Stargazer, Casablanca, Rubrum, Day, Japanese Show and Easter lily. These toxic lilies can prove deadly for your cat. If your cat swallows even a tiny amount of any portion of these plants, including the pollen, kidney failure can result.

    FERTILISERS AND WEED KILLER

    1fert

    The fertilizer you use on your plants can be just as dangerous, or more so, than the plants themselves. If you fertilize your lawn and garden in the spring, you should be aware of which types of fertilizer compounds are potentially fatal if swallowed by your pet. Most fertilizers cause only mild gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten, but there are a few watch-outs including fertilizers containing blood meal, bone meal, disulfoton or another type of organophosphate, and iron.

     

    THIS LIST IS DOES NOT INCLUDE EVERY PLANT OR DANGER THAT SPRING PRESENTS. IF YOUR PET HAS INGESTED SOMETHING AND YOU ARE UNSURE IF IT IS HARMFUL, PLEASE DONT HESITATE TO CALL US ON 01327 350239 (Towcester) or 01327 344999 (Weedon)

    Kat Mozdzynski
    ABOUT KAT MOZDZYNSKI RVN MBVNA
    Kat has been nursing for 12 years and joined the team at Towcester Vets back in 2013. She enjoys all aspects of nursing and specialises in clinical work and acupuncture.
    View all posts by Kat Mozdzynski →